sexta-feira, 12 de junho de 2020

ARISS Multi-point Telebridge Contact with school in Spain

REMINDER

An ARISS educational school contact is planned for Chris Cassidy KF5KDR with students at I.E.S. Pedro de Valdivia, Villanueva de la Serena, Spain.
The students will be talking with the ISS from their homes over phone lines. The link to the ISS will be operated by the amateur radio ground station ON4ISS, located in Belgium.

The contact is scheduled on Tuesday June 16, 2020 at approximately 12:25  UTC, which is 14:25 CEST.

Downlink signals will be audible over Western Europe on 145.800 MHz narrowband FM.
Watch for live stream at: https://youtu.be/PyNqsTMqAoQ 

This ARISS-Europe News Bulletin is sent to 2832 subscibers.

73,
aston Bertels ON4WF

domingo, 7 de junho de 2020

ARISS Release: ARISS-USA

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Team in the United States Creates a New Organization: ARISS-USA ARISS-USA is now the US-based organization connecting students with astronauts in space.

Towson, Maryland –June 4, 2020
In late May, the USA team of the ARISS International working group became an incorporated non- profit entity in the state of Maryland, officially becoming ARISS-USA. This move allows ARISS-USA to work as an independent organization, soliciting grants and donations. They will continue promoting amateur radio and STEAM—science, technology, engineering, arts, and math within educational organizations and inspire, engage and educate our next generation of space enthusiasts.
ARISS-USA will maintain its collaborative work with ARISS International as well as with US sponsors, partners, and interest groups. The main goal of ARISS-USA remains as connecting educational groups with opportunities to interact with astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ARISS-USA will expand its human spaceflight opportunities with the space agencies, beyond low Earth orbit, starting with lunar opportunities including the Lunar Gateway. ARISS-USA will continue to review and
accept proposals for ISS contacts and expand its other educational opportunities to increase interest in space sciences and radio communications.
Becoming an independent organization has been discussed for quite some time. ARISS-USA lead Frank Bauer, KA3HDO said "The scope and reach of what ARISS accomplishes each year has grown significantly since its humble beginnings in 1996. Our working group status made it cumbersome to establish partnerships, sign agreements and solicit grants. These can only be done as an established organization." Bauer further elaborated, "The ARISS-USA team remains deeply indebted to our
working group partners—ARRL and AMSAT, who enabled the birth of ARISS—and our steadfast sponsors, NASA Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) and the ISS National Lab (INL)." ARISS-USA aims to keep earning high regards from all these partners and sponsors.
While ARISS-USA is now an incorporated non-profit entity, we are in the process of applying for tax exemption as a Section 501 (c) (3) charitable, scientific or educational organization. Until that status is approved by the USA Internal Revenue Service, donations made directly to ARISS-USA will not be tax deductible for taxpayers in the USA. Those wanting to make a tax deductible donation for the benefit of ARISS-USA can, in the meantime, continue to make donations to ARISS sponsor AMSAT-NA through
the ARISS website at: www.ariss.org.
As ARISS-USA begins a new era as a human spaceflight amateur radio organization, it acknowledges those who were so instrumental in the formation of human spaceflight amateur radio. These include Vic Clark, W4KFC and Dave Sumner, K1ZZ from the ARRL; Bill Tynan, W3XO and Tom Clark, W3IO from AMSAT; Roy Neal, K6DUE a major guide for SAREX and ARISS; and NASA astronaut Owen Garriott, W5LFL. Also remembered is Pam Mountjoy, NASA education, who had the vision to develop the
ARISS working group as a single amateur radio focus into the space agencies. All of these giants' shoulders are what ARISS-USA rests upon.
###
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73 Carlos Nora, CT1END
NNNN



Sem vírus. www.avast.com

quinta-feira, 28 de maio de 2020

ARISS News Release (ANR) No. 20-05

ARISS News Release                                                                                                   No.   20-05     

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@amsat.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Coming Soon!!

Mid-Altitude Balloon Race Planned for June 1

Three Space Station Explorer teams participate in an exciting

distance learning—social distanced balloon race to be held during Pandemic

May 27, 2020—ARISS educator, Joanne Michael is an amateur radio operator with callsign KM6BWB.  Joanne is also a science coach at the Wiseburn Unified School District in Los Angeles, California where she leads her students in several balloon launch attempts from the Los Angeles area each year.  With this year different because of the pandemic, Joanne wanted to "shake things up a bit" and give students, world-wide, a unique distance learning treat while keeping all safe during the pandemic.  So Joanne challenged Ted Tagami, KK6UUQ, from Magnitude.io to a mid-altitude cross-continent balloon race and Ted accepted the challenge!  Ted plans to launch his balloon from Oakland, California.  ISS Above inventor, Liam Kennedy, KN6EQU, from Pasadena, California, got "wind" of the idea and he asked to participate, too.  All three organizations: ARISS, Magnitude.io and ISS Above are ISS National Lab Space Station Explorer (SSE) partners that work to inspire, engage, and educate students in Science Technology Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) topics and to pursue STEAM careers. 

The three SSE teams plan to launch their balloons simultaneously on June 1st.  The winner will be the first one to cross the "Finish Line"—the Eastern Time zone.  Launch time is planned for 15:00 UTC/11:00 EDT/10:00 CDT/9:00 MDT/8:00 PDT.  A live video feed of the launch is planned to start approximately 5 minutes prior to the event.

Once the balloons are airborne, students can track each balloon's location, altitude, and temperature via amateur radio APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System) which is fed automatically to the aprs.fi web site.  Educators and parents around the globe can excite at-home youth with this initiative. Students can tally and track the states each balloon travels through and plot altitude versus temperature, etc. Also, by researching weather patterns, students can make assumptions from their own data.  This could include speed variations due to weather.  They also can predict each balloon's flight path and when they might cross the finish line!

For more information on the balloon launch, lesson plans, and the livestream video link (when the livestream URL is available), please go to:  https://www.ariss.org/mid-altitude-balloon-race.html

Enjoy the Race!  May the best ballooner win!!

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org



Media Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

    

 

 


domingo, 10 de maio de 2020

ARISS News Release (ANR) No. 20-04

ARISS News Release No. 20-04

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@amsat.org




FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE



ARISS to Attempt Second Test of New

Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio


May 10, 2020—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is announcing a second test of its new distance-learning ARISS radio contacts with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and astronauts with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).


This will be the second test of the new-style radio contact, called Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio. The concept was developed for distance learning when schools closed worldwide due to COVID-19. The virus eliminated all opportunities for ARISS radio contacts at education organizations. A new ARISS telebridge radio ground station will be used this time, this operated by John Sygo, amateur radio call sign ZS6JON, near Johannesburg, South Africa.


The new concept requires three things. The ARISS telebridge radio ground station--a satellite ham radio station with special equipment that an ARISS team member uses for teleconferencing, the ham astronaut on the ISS using the ARISS ham radio station, and students at their homes. The telebridge radio operator links to the astronaut at the ARISS radio mic, and each youth ties in from home via their telephones. Their families can listen along with faculty and the public from home. Each student takes a turn asking their question of the astronaut.


The youth taking part in ARISS's second test belong to the Airdrie Space Science Club in Airdrie, AB, Canada The radio contact is scheduled for May 15 at 15:10 UTC. ISS Commander Chris Cassidy, amateur radio call sign KF5KDR, will support the ARISS radio contact. Prior to COVID, the students had participated in space and radio communications lessons such as balloon launches with ham radio payloads and building model rockets to launch. Brian Jackson, amateur radio call sign VE6JBJ, is one of the five club leaders. He related, "During this pandemic, our opportunities to develop kids' interest in space has been interrupted. This ARISS contact gets them looking back up, towards the sky, and imagining themselves as an astronaut one day."


ARISS invites the public to view the livestream of the upcoming ARISS radio test at: https://youtu.be/2mflSlShPHA.


During the contact, youth will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:



1. How has seeing Earth from its orbit affected you, in your frame of reference when moving around the

ISS, or in your perspective of humanity as a whole?

2. What happens if you vomit in the space station? How do you clean it up?

3. How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected you while you are in space?

4. What will be your first meal when you get back to Earth?

5. What does it feel like when the rocket lifts off?

6. What does the space station smell like?

7. Was training to be an astronaut harder or easier than training to be a navy seal?

8. What experiment that you've done had the most unexpected results? What was the expected and

actual outcome of said experiment?

9. How successful is your 3-D printer on the station?

10. We are a model rocket building club. Did you ever build model rockets when you were young?

11. What does microgravity feel like on your body?

12. Does the Earth look any clearer or less polluted now compared to when you flew in 2009 and with

Canadian Chris Hadfield in 2013?

13. Do you play any games while you are on the ISS?

14. What kind of music do you listen to?



About ARISS:


Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.




Like us on Facebook at Amateur Radio On The ISS (ARISS)

Like us on Instagram at ariss_int

Follow us on Twitter at ARISS_status




M edia Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR



terça-feira, 28 de abril de 2020

ARISS school contact on YouTube from Virginia, USA

ARISS school contact on YouTube from Virginia, USA

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at Northern Virginia Schools Group, Woodbridge VA on 30 April. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 13:35 UTC, which is 15.35 CEST.  It is recommended that you start listening approximately 10 minutes before this time. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds.

The contact will be a Multi-Point Telebridge between NA1SS and AB1OC. A multi-point telebridge contact means that each student will be on the telebridge from their own home. The contact should be audible over the state of New Hampshire and adjacent areas. U.S. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink.

The contact is expected to be conducted in English. Watch for live stream at: https://youtu.be/Cu8I9ose4Vo


Story:
We are students from Northern Virginia. We are ages 5-10 years old and we are in K-5th grade, in Woodbridge VA, just outside of DC. Our school year was ended on March 13th and we have been home learning many things using distance learning methods. We have been learning how to get along in small spaces with little contact with the rest of our community. We are learning quickly how it must feel to be on the ISS!

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:
1. What does the sun look like from outer space?
2. How comfortable is it to sleep in space?
3. What is one thing you want to eat when you get back to earth?
4. I've heard that stars are red, yellow and blue. Can you see those colors in space when you look at the stars?
5. Besides your family, what do you miss most while being in space?
6. What are your thoughts on our Covid-19 situation right now? Does the Earth look differently over the last 3
months now that many people are inside and not creating pollution?
7. How often do you get to go out of the ISS? Have you been on any space walks?
8. Who makes the rocket that takes you to the ISS?
9. What does it feel like to float all the time?
10. Do you use flashlights on space walks?
11. How do you exercise in space?
12. How do you get out for space walks safely without the air from the ISS coming out into space? How does it
feel to walk in space?
13. What do you wear in the space station?
14. How did it feel when you first got to space?
15. How is space different from Earth?
16. What do you study in school to become an astronaut?
17. What do you like the most about being in space?
18. Were you nervous when you launched into space?
19. How do you communicate with loved ones while you are in space?

PLEASE CHECK THE FOLLOWING FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ARISS UPDATES:
Visit ARISS on Facebook. We can be found at Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS).
To receive our Twitter updates, follow @ARISS_status

About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

Thank you & 73,
David Jordan AA4KN

quarta-feira, 29 de janeiro de 2020

ISS MAI SSTV – 30 e 31 JAN 2020

O Instituto de Aviação de Moscou realizará uma das suas experiências em SSTV a 30 Jan cerca das 13:30 UTC até cerca de 19:00 UTC e novamente a 31 de janeiro cerca das 15:00 UTC até por volta de 17:30 UTCO computador que suporta esta atividade falhou recentemente, mas um computador de substituição está sendo usado, mas não se sabe qual o impacto que esta mudança pode ter para as operações. 

73 e boa receção de SSTV
Carlos Nora, CT1END
NNNN



quinta-feira, 23 de janeiro de 2020

ARISS educational radio contact with school in Portugal

ARISS educational radio contact with school in Portugal

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at Agrupamento de Escolas Serafim Leite, Sao Joao da Madeira, Portugal.
The event is scheduled on Monday 27 January 2020 at approximately 16.33 UTC, which is 17.33 CEWT.
The contact is expected to be conducted in English.
The contact will be a direct between astronaut Luca Parmitano KF5KPD and CS2ASL.
The contact should be audible over parts of Europe. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz narrowband FM downlink.

School information:
The Serafim Leite Schools is located in the north of Portugal in the city of Sao Joao da Madeira.
It was born in 1957, and during this 60 years of existence it has been growing.
It started by being a school with only the grammar and today has all levels of education:
First cycle, Second cycle, Third cycle and Secondary.
Currently it has more than 1200 students and 110 teachers that are distributed in three buildings that make up the Serafim Leite schools cluster.
Its identity is closely linked to vocational education that is a national reference in vocational education. The training offer includes Electronics, Computer, Mechanical, Audiovisual, Markting, Science and Technology, Socioeconomic Sciences, Visual Arts and recurrent adult education.
It is a school where children arrive still small in their parents' arms and leave the school like men and women who are already graduated with a high degree of knowledge.
It is in this educational environment where human and social values are privileged that our students grow with the notion that humanity is urgently required to take action to reverse the global warming of the earth, making their own school an Eco-School.
The astronaut could be our eyes helping us to look the Earth in another way.

Students First Names & Questions:
1. Clara: What is your daily routine like on board?
2. Frederico: When you have a health problem what do you do? Are there any doctors on board?
3. Catarina: When astronauts go to space for how long do they stay there?
4. Mariana: Do you miss family?
5. Marcelo: Do you remember the very first moment that you look outside de ISS and saw the planet earth? What did you felt and did you think of someone special?
6. Joana: How do you bath in a ship?
7. Alexandra: How can you get water in space?
8. Tiago: What is it like to live in the ISS?
9. Sebastiao: What kind of experiences take place from the ISS and what are the advantages of making them from there?
10. Maria: How is it possible to create an atmosphere within the ISS?
11. Joao: Is the perception of time on board of the ISS different from the one you have on Earth?
12. Gabriel: How many hours of exercise should an astronaut do each day?
13. Bruna: What effects does space flight have on the human body, and what do you feel?
14. Maria: When you are not working what do you do?
15. Rodrigo: Being a different profession how old did you realize you wanted to be an astronaut?
16. Ines: What do you miss the most about Earth?
17. Eduardo: How can weightlessness influence the health of astronauts?
18. Rita: Tell us about your adventure in space?
19. Diva: How can you communicate with your family?
20. Vania: Do you feel scared when you are in space?
21. Ana: How and where do they sleep?
22. Daniela: How long do astronauts train to perform space missions?
23. Sara Correia: Do you have any specific food when you are on missions?
24. Alexandre: In an emergency situation can you all return to Earth?

About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, CSA, ESA, Roscosmos, JAXA.
In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.
73,
Gaston Bertels ON4WF

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quarta-feira, 22 de janeiro de 2020

REP-ARISS : Contato direto Agrup. Escolas Serafim Leite, São João Madeira - 27JAN2020


No dia 27 de janeiro de 2020 cerca das 16h33 na orbita nº 21008, encontra-se agendado um contato escolar direto com a Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS) e o Agrupamento de Escolas Serafim Leite em São João da Madeira, conforme inscrição efetuada pelo grupo de trabalho da REP-ARISS.
 
Foi instalada na escola a estação de radioamador com o indicativo CS2ASL.

O contato direto entre as estações de amador CS2ASL operada por Marco Vasconcelos - CT1EAV e OR4ISS operada pelo astronauta Luca Parmitano - KF5KDP,no qual vamos tentar realizar as perguntas feitas pelos alunos.


ARISS News:

Agrupamento de Escolas Serafim Leite, São João da Madeira, Portugal, direct via CS2ASL
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Luca Parmitano KF5KDP

Proposed questions generated by Agrupamento de Escolas Serafim Leite students:
1. What is your daily routine like on board?
2. When you have a health problem what do you do? Are there any doctors on board?
3. When astronauts go to space for how long do they stay there?
4. Do you miss family?
5. Do you remember the very first moment that you look outside de ISS and saw the planet earth? What did you felt and did you think of someone special?
6. How do you bath in a ship?
7. How can you get water in space?
8. What is it like to live in the ISS?
9. What kind of experiences take place from the ISS and what are the advantages of making them from there?
10. How is it possible to create an atmosphere within the ISS?
11. Is the perception of time on board of the ISS different from the one you have on Earth?
12. How many hours of exercise should an astronaut do each day?
13. What effects does space flight have on the human body, and what do you feel?
14. When you are not working what do you do?
15. Being a different profession how old did you realize you wanted to be an astronaut?
16. What do you miss the most about Earth?
17. How can weightlessness influence the health of astronauts?
18. Tell us about your adventure in space?
19. How can you communicate with your family?
20. Do you feel scared when you are in space?
21. How and where do they sleep?
22. How long do astronauts train to perform space missions?
23. Do you have any specific food when you are on missions?
24. In an emergency situation can you all return to Earth?


Os nossos melhores cumprimentos.
73, Carlos Nora - CT1END
NNNN

--




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sábado, 18 de janeiro de 2020

ARISS educational radio contact with school in Toronto, Canada


ARISS educational radio contact with school in Toronto, Canada

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, Canada.

The event is scheduled on Wednesday 22 January 2020 at approximately 17:21 UTC, which is 18.21 CEWT.

The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

The contact will be a telebridge between astronaut Luca Parmitano KF5KPD and IK1SLD, located in northern Italy.

The contact should be audible over Italy and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.800 MHz narrowband FM downlink.

Moreover, operations at IK1SLD ground station will be web cast on
 https://www.ariotti.com/

Story:
Jean Moffet has volunteered at the Ontario Science Centre's amateur radio station VE3OSC for more than 30 years, sharing her knowledge of and passion for ham radio with countless visitors. Having recently celebrated her 96th birthday, Jean indicated one of her bucket list items is to speak to an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS). To honour her invaluable contribution, the Science Centre is working with the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Canada to help Jean check this item off her list.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:
1. Did you have an opinion about extra-terrestrial life before being on the ISS; has being on the ISS changed your views?
2. Being a mature woman, I have done a lot of cleaning. Has seeing Earth from near-space given you any thoughts on modifying existing technology, say attachments to airplanes, to help with excess greenhouse gas clean-up?
3. Have you seen space junk? How bad is the problem?
4. Did you always want to be an astronaut? What did your parents think?
5. What personal item did you bring with you and why?
6. What do you miss most about your usual life?
7. What is the most stressful situation in space you have experienced and how did it turn out?
8. What life lesson have you brought back that you can share with us from your most stressful situation in space?
9. How do you relieve boredom on ISS? Do you play with fidget toys, Silly Putty, games, music?
10. Does food taste different on the space station? How do you deal with food cravings?
11. What effects of microgravity have been the hardest to adjust to?
12. What are your thoughts on the portrayal of space in movies?
13. What does space look like from the International Space Station?
14. What is your favourite view of Earth from the space station?
15. What are your three favourite things about being on the space station?
16. Do you miss being able to go out for a walk whenever you want?



PLEASE CHECK THE FOLLOWING FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ARISS UPDATES:
Visit ARISS on Facebook. We can be found at Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS).
To receive our Twitter updates, follow @ARISS_status


About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, CSA, ESA, Roscosmos, JAXA.
In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

73,
Gaston Bertels ON4WF
ARISS past chairman

sexta-feira, 17 de janeiro de 2020

Escola portuguesa vai estabelecer contacto rádio com a Estação Espacial Internacional - ISS


Escola portuguesa vai estabelecer contacto rádio com a Estação Espacial Internacional - ISS


Os alunos do Agrupamento de Escolas Dr. Serafim Leite, com o apoio da Rede dos Emissores Portugueses - REP, vão estabelecer contacto rádio com astronautas da ISS.

 

Convidamos-vos a participar neste evento live com a Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS).

 

Este evento visa contactar, oficialmente, o astronauta de serviço (elemento tripulação da ISS atual) via rádio numa data que será divulgada muito em breve. Este evento acontecerá entre 27 de janeiro e 2 de fevereiro de 2020.

 

O evento consiste em 20 alunos, um de cada vez, faça a sua respetiva pergunta em inglês (pré-aprovada) ao astronauta Luca Paramitano para que responda em tempo real. Estas questões serão colocadas e respondidas dentro de um período de +- 20 minutos.

O meio de comunicação entre o Auditório da escola  e a Estação Espacial Internacional serão providenciados e garantidos pelo grupo de trabalho REP-ARISS.

O objetivo principal deste tipo de evento é motivar o interesse dos mais jovens no aeroespacial bem como no radioamadorismo

 

Sobre o Agrupamento de Escolas Serafim Leite, São João da Madeira, Portugal 


O nascimento da escola começou a delinear-se a 24 de Janeiro de 1957, quando uma comissão de sanjoanenses se deslocou a Lisboa para solicitar ao Ministro Leite Pinto a criação de uma Escola Técnica Industrial.
Apesar da criação da Escola já estar prevista no Decreto-Lei nº 36409, de 11 de Janeiro de 1947, só então S. João da Madeira apresentava as condições essenciais para que tal se tornasse uma realidade, uma vez que a sua população se situava perto dos 11 mil habitantes, graças a uma industria próspera ( chapelaria, calçado e metalurgia ) e a um comércio em expansão.

Nos primeiros meses de 1958 foi publicado o diploma que criou a Escola Industrial de S. João da Madeira, ficando dotada somente com o Ciclo Preparatório, uma vez que as suas instalações, naquela altura, não asseguravam o funcionamento de todas as atividades. Estabelecidos os moldes para o funcionamento da Escola, a partir de Outubro de 1958, foram abertas as matrículas para o exame de admissão para o ingresso no Ciclo Preparatório. No ano lectivo de 1960/61 entrou em funcionamento o pavilhão anexo ao antigo edifício da Escola Técnica.

No ano de 1971 iniciou-se a transferência para o atual edifício, sendo primeiramente transferida a secção de Mecânica e, posteriormente, os outros sectores. Em 1977/78 a Escola Industrial transforma-se em Escola Secundária nº1 e, a partir de 2 de Abril de 1987, passou a designar-se Escola Secundária Dr. Serafim Leite. No ano letivo 1983/84 inicia-se a expansão pedagógica que permitiu o funcionamento, em 84/85, do primeiro Curso Técnico de Instalações Elétricas, seguindo-se cursos de Informática, Assistente de Gestão, Eletrónica e Contabilidade.

Em 2014 a Escola Secundária junta-se às Escolas Básicas do Parque e de Fundo de Vila, constituindo o Agrupamento de Escolas Dr. Serafim Leite, mantendo uma oferta formativa diversificada desde a Educação Pré-Escolar até aos cursos para adultos.

Página em http://essl.pt/


Sobre a REP – Rede dos Emissores Portugueses

A REP é a Associação de Radioamadores mais antiga de Portugal, com 92 anos de existência.

Foi fundada em 1926, constituindo-se por Alvará do Governo Civil de Lisboa em 5 de março de 1930, e pelo Decreto-Lei n.º 36 438, de 29 de julho de 1947. É uma instituição de Utilidade Pública desde 10 de julho de 1980. É a representante em Portugal de Organismos internacionais, nomeadamente da IARU - International Amateur Radio Union, da qual é membro fundador, e membro da ARISS Europa.

É uma instituição de direito privado sem fins lucrativos, exclusivamente composta por Amadores, Investigadores e Exploradores das Tecnologias da Rádio e das Comunicações, através da emissão e receção de sinais em ondas médias e curtas, altas frequências e micro-ondas, comunicações aeroespaciais e digitais.

Tem por finalidade congregar e representar institucionalmente os radioamadores, de molde que resultem em benefício Educativo e Social, nomeadamente no âmbito das Ciências Radioelétricas de manifesto interesse público e civilizacional. Ver mais em: www.rep.pt

 

Sobre a ARISS - Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

O Radioamador na Estação Espacial Internacional (ARISS) inspira estudantes, em todo o mundo, para desenvolver os interesses e carreiras em ciência, tecnologia, engenharia e matemática através de oportunidades de comunicação de rádio amador com a tripulação em órbita na Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS). Os alunos aprendem sobre a vida a bordo da ISS e a explorar a Terra vista do espaço por meio de atividades de ciência e matemática.

 A ARISS oferece a oportunidade da comunidade escolar (alunos, professores, famílias e membros da comunidade) se tornarem mais conscientes dos benefícios substanciais de voos espaciais tripulados, e das explorações e descobertas que ocorrem no voo espacial.

Os alunos têm a oportunidade de aprender sobre tecnologias espaciais e as tecnologias envolvidas com comunicações espaciais através da exploração de rádio amador. 

Diversas organizações de radioamadores, e as agências espaciais dos EUA, Rússia, Canadá, Japão e Europa patrocinam esta oportunidade educacional fornecendo o equipamento e apoio operacional para permitir a comunicação direta entre a tripulação na ISS e estudantes de todo o mundo através de rádio amador.

Centenas de radioamadores de todo o mundo trabalham nos bastidores para tornar estas experiências educacionais possíveis. O Radioamadorismo é um passatempo popular e um serviço em que os participantes licenciados operaram equipamentos de comunicação com um profundo conhecimento da arte do rádio.

A ARISS foi criada e é gerida por um grupo de trabalho internacional, incluindo vários países da Europa, assim como Japão, Rússia, Canadá e EUA. A organização é mantida por voluntários das organizações de radioamadores nacionais e as AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) organizações internacionais de cada país. Dado que a ARISS é de âmbito internacional, a equipe coordena localmente com sua respetiva agência espacial e como uma equipe internacional através de grupos de trabalho, reuniões, teleconferências e webinars. Para mais informações visite www.ariss.org

 

Outros contactos com a estação espacial internacional (ISS):

 

     Colégio Campo Flores, Lazarim                 reportagem_TVI_e_TVI24.mp4 

                                                                            https://youtu.be/xHRiW_8LV6A

Escola Secundária da Estarreja

Escola EB I-JI Montenegro

Agrupamento Escolas do Fundão

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjKdNDI5TGs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56wl1DscpfU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vgip544Tp5M

 

Na medida do possível, agradecemos confirmação da vossa presença para efeitos de logística.

Toda a informação será publicada em http://www.rep.pt/cs5ss

 

                    

### 


quinta-feira, 26 de dezembro de 2019

Fwd: ARISS News Release (ANR) No. 19-18



              

 

ARISS News Release                                                                                                                             No. 19-18

 

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@amsat.org

Dec. 24, 2019

SSTV Event Planned for Late December

 

ARISS is planning an SSTV event featuring commemorative images. This event is currently scheduled to begin on December 28, 2019 at 11:00 UTC and ends at 18:20 UTC on January 1, 2020. Please make note that sometimes changes may occur in the crew work schedule that could affect our SSTV transmission dates and times, so frequently check our ARISS Facebook and Twitter accounts shown below for any updates before and throughout the event.   

 

Transmissions will be sent at 145.800 MHz FM in the SSTV mode PD-120. Once received, images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php and you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. See https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ for details. Also for simplicity, we have added a new information tab for SSTV events, under the General Contacts pulldown menu at www.ariss.org .

 

About ARISS:

 

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

 

ARISS Facebook: Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS)

ARISS Twitter: @ARISS_status

 

Media Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@amsat.org

 

                                                                       

 


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terça-feira, 24 de dezembro de 2019

ARISS SSTV Transmissions



ARISS SSTV Transmissions 


ARISS will be supporting SSTV transmissions worldwide in memory of cosmonauts Alexei Leonov, Valery Bykovsky and Sigmund Jaehn.

The transmissions are scheduled from December 28, 2019, starting at 11:00 UTC, until January 1, 2020 at 18:20 UTC when the system is scheduled for shutdown.

Transmissions will be on the standard frequency of 145.800 MHz and in the PD 120 format.

The Polish ARISS Team prepared an award for participants to this SSTV experiment. Please see https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Many thanks to ARISS Russia for setting up this worldwide SSTV event.


Season's Greetings !
73,
Gaston Bertels ON4WF



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