segunda-feira, 18 de março de 2019

ARISS contact TELEBRIDGE planned for students in Calgary, Canada



An International Space Station school contact has been planned for David St-Jacques KG5FYI with North Point School for Boys, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

The event is scheduled Wednesday March 20, 2019 at approximately 20.16 UTC (21.16 CEWT).

The conversation will be conducted in English.
The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD.
The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.
Moreover, the operations at IK1SLD will be webcast on:

http://www.ik1sld.org/live/
http://www.ariotti.com/

School Information:
North Point School for Boys, a private school in Calgary, provides a setting for boys from Kindergarten to Grade 9 in which they are challenged and motivated, developing into young men of integrity with a genuine love of learning. Through strong mentors, experiential learning and blended learning, students discover who they are and how they learn.
Students will be learning about the International Space Station through social discussion, science class and engineering academy. Students will be building a scale model of the International Space Station and learning Canada's commitment to the space program.

Students First Names & Questions:
1. Omar (Gr. 9): How did you train to become an astronaut?
2. Josh (Gr. 8): What do you do all day?
3. Rowan (Gr. 8): Is time different on the space station?
4. Cayden (Gr. 7): What is it like being weightless in space?
5. Daniel (Gr. 7): Is it hard to move around?
6. Krystian (Gr. 6): What is your favorite space food?
7. Gavin (Gr. 6): What is the coolest thing you have seen while on the space station?
8. Dominic (Gr. 5): How long does it take to get used to zero gravity?
9. Caleb (Gr. 5): What did you bring with you to the International Space Station?
10. Declan (Gr. 4): Was it scary launching on the Space Shuttle?
11. Omar (Gr. 9): Will you get to do a spacewalk?
12. Josh (Gr. 8): Do you operate the Canadarm?
13. Rowan (Gr. 8): What does the sunrise look like?
14. Cayden (Gr. 7): How long was the Soyuz ride?
15. Daniel (Gr. 7): What is your rank with the Canadian Space Agency?
16. Krystian (Gr. 6): Do you get to see all the parts of the International Space Station?
17. Gavin (Gr. 6): Can you see Canada from space?
18. Dominic (Gr. 5): How do astronauts breathe with their EVA suits on?
19. Caleb (Gr. 5): Do astronauts eat together?
20. Declan (Gr. 4): What is it like being in space?

About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support. 
ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning.
The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

73,
Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

terça-feira, 12 de março de 2019

Fwd: ARISS contact telebridge planned for students in Calgary, Canada



An International Space Station school contact has been planned for David St-Jacques KG5FYI with North Point School for Boys, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

The event is scheduled Wednesday March 20, 2019 at approximately 20.16 UTC (21.16 CEWT).
The conversation will be conducted in English.
The contact will be a telebridge operated by IK1SLD.
The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.
Moreover, the operations at IK1SLD will be webcast on
http://www.ik1sld.org/live/

School Information:
North Point School for Boys, a private school in Calgary, provides a setting for boys from Kindergarten to Grade 9 in which they are challenged and motivated, developing into young men of integrity with a genuine love of learning. Through strong mentors, experiential learning and blended learning, students discover who they are and how they learn.
Students will be learning about the International Space Station through social discussion, science class and engineering academy. Students will be building a scale model of the International Space Station and learning Canada's commitment to the space program.

Students First Names & Questions:
1. Omar (Gr. 9): How did you train to become an astronaut?
2. Josh (Gr. 8): What do you do all day?
3. Rowan (Gr. 8): Is time different on the space station?
4. Cayden (Gr. 7): What is it like being weightless in space?
5. Daniel (Gr. 7): Is it hard to move around?
6. Krystian (Gr. 6): What is your favorite space food?
7. Gavin (Gr. 6): What is the coolest thing you have seen while on the space station?
8. Dominic (Gr. 5): How long does it take to get used to zero gravity?
9. Caleb (Gr. 5): What did you bring with you to the International Space Station?
10. Declan (Gr. 4): Was it scary launching on the Space Shuttle?
11. Omar (Gr. 9): Will you get to do a spacewalk?
12. Josh (Gr. 8): Do you operate the Canadarm?
13. Rowan (Gr. 8): What does the sunrise look like?
14. Cayden (Gr. 7): How long was the Soyuz ride?
15. Daniel (Gr. 7): What is your rank with the Canadian Space Agency?
16. Krystian (Gr. 6): Do you get to see all the parts of the International Space Station?
17. Gavin (Gr. 6): Can you see Canada from space?
18. Dominic (Gr. 5): How do astronauts breathe with their EVA suits on?
19. Caleb (Gr. 5): Do astronauts eat together?
20. Declan (Gr. 4): What is it like being in space?

About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support. 
ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning.
The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

73,
Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

quarta-feira, 27 de fevereiro de 2019

ARISS contact planned for students in Spain


An International Space Station school contact has been planned for David St-Jacques KG5FYI with Ceip Nuestra Senora Del Carmen, Torre De La Reina, Spain.

The event is scheduled Tuesday March 5, 2019 at approximately 09:50 UTC (10:50 CEWT).

The conversation will be conducted in English.
The contact will be a direct operated by EG7NSC.
The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

School Information:
Torre de la Reina is located south of the main population center of Guillena (Sevilla) about 2 kilometers from it and is about 19 meters above sea level.
It is also just 17 kilometers from Seville capital if you take the direction to the south on the A-431 road, also enjoying a strategic location rivileged to be located very close to the A-66 (Autovía de la Plata) that connects
Sevilla capital with Extremadura.
Our school is located in the town of Torre de la Reina, (Seville, Spain), with 215 students, including children and primary school. It has two buildings, one of the infantile stage (recent construction) and another one of primary (something older). The staff consists of 15 teachers. We are a small center, but with a young staff, willing to invest in experiences of all kinds that enrich our students.
There are many activities that we carry out within different projects, with the aim not only of fulfilling
the educational curriculum, but also of developing competences to train integral people.
Also one of our hallmarks of identity is to form values and an emotional education, because we consider that it is fundamental in the education of today's society.
The heart and the vocation to educate is our engine every day. The resources we have are not many, but the human side compensates for any technical and material aspect.

Students First Names & Questions:
1. Celia: What did you think when you saw Earth from space?
2. Joaquin: What are you currently investigating on the ISS?
3. Pablo: When did you decide to become an astronaut?
4. Adrian: How do you live in such a small place?
5. Asuncion: How long do you need to recover after finishing your missions?
6. Francisco: If an astronaut floats away from the ISS, what do you have to do?
7. Elsa: Which values and skills should an astronaut have?
8. Sergio: Can you eat whatever you want?
9. Carmen: What´s the most common problem inside the ISS?
10. Aliu: Could you go to Mars with this ISS?
11. Paola: Can you have a shower or bath there?
12. Maria: Where do you throw your rubbish?
13. Andrea: How long can you stay at the ISS?
14. Angela: Is there a doctor in the ISS?
15. Irene: How many hours do you sleep every day?
16. Jaime: How do you keep fit?
17. Margarita: What´s your favourite food and drink there?
18. Pablo: Do you listen to music at work?
19. Lucia: Can you see our country from the ISS?
20. Jose: When will you come back to Earth?

About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support. 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

73,
Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

quinta-feira, 14 de fevereiro de 2019

Fwd: ARISS

Announcing ARISS Slow Scan TV Event

Feb 14, 2019

 ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 15 at 08:45 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 17 at 17:25 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ .

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@amsat.org, the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status.


About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

Also join us on Facebook: Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
Follow us on Twitter: ARISS_status

73,
Gaston Bertels ON4WF

quarta-feira, 6 de fevereiro de 2019

ARISS/NOTA anúncio evento de SSTV - Slow Scan TV

ARISS/NOTA anúncio evento de SSTV - Slow Scan TV

ARISS está planeando outro dos seus populares eventos de experimentação de Slow Scan Television (SSTV). 
As transmissões estão programadas para começar na sexta-feira, 8 de fevereiro, às 18:25 UTC, e vão até o domingo, 10 de fevereiro, às 18:30 UTC
As operações de SSTV são um processo pelo qual as imagens são enviadas da Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS) via meios de radioamador e recebidas por 
radioamadores, ouvintes de ondas curtas e outros entusiastas de rádio na Terra, semelhantes a imagens compartilhadas em "smartphones" usando twitter ou instagram.

Quando este evento está ativo, as imagens SSTV serão transmitidas da ISS na frequência de 145.800 MHz usando o modo SSTV do PD120 e podem ser recebidas usando um 
equipamento de radioamador tão simples quanto um rádio portátil de 2 metros ou um receptor comum de ondas curtas ou que cubra a faixa de amador nos 2 metros. 
Após conectar a saída de áudio do receptor de rádio à entrada de áudio de um computador que executa software livre, como MMSSTV, as imagens SSTV podem ser recebidas/exibidas. 

As transmissões consistirão de oito imagens da NASA No Ar (NOTA) "Nasa On The Air" (veja https: //nasaontheair.wordpress .com / ). 
Além disso, quatro imagens comemorativas da ARISS também serão incluídas. 

Mais informações em http://rep-ariss.blogspot.com/


Os nossos melhores cumprimentos.
73, Carlos Nora - CT1END
NNNN

Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event


Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event

Feb 2, 2019:

 ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 18:25 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ .

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@amsat.org, the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status.


About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

Also join us on Facebook: Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)

Follow us on Twitter: ARISS_status

Media Contact:
Dave Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR
aa4kn@amsat.org

quinta-feira, 31 de janeiro de 2019

REP-ARISS atividade SSTV Inter-MAI - imagens recebidas


Caros colegas

Imagens recebidas no modo SSTV desde a Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS) na frequência de 145,800 MHz nas passagens sobre a Europa.



Enviem as vossas para publicação no nosso site em http://rep-ariss.blogspot.com/






ARISS News Release No. 19-01






 

S:\Artwork\ARISS logos\ARISS MastHead.jpg

 

ARISS News Release                                                                                                  No. 19-01

 

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@amsat.org

Jan. 30, 2019

 

The ARISS Team Thanks You for Your Tremendous Support in 2018!

 

As the ARISS team reviews 2018 successes, it is time to say thank you to our very dedicated supporters.  To begin expressing thanks appropriately, ARISS commends 2018 donors who contributed $1,000 or more.  The extreme confidence in ARISS by these generous individuals, organizations, and corporations propels ARISS's successes in using Amateur Radio for a thrilling conversation with an orbiting ISS astronaut to introduce youth, educators, and others to science, technology, engineering, arts, and math, space, radio technology and Amateur Radio. They are:

 

Tom Clark, K3IO

Dayton Amateur Radio Association

John Dean, K0JDD

Frank Donovan, W3LPL

HamJam, sponsored by North Fulton Amateur Radio League

Irving Amateur Radio Club  

JVC KENWOOD Corporation

Joe Lynch, N6CL & Carol Lynch, W6CL

MFJ:  Martin Jue, K5FLU & Betty Jue

Levi Maaia, K6LCM & Daniela Maaia, W6DRM

Ren Roderick, K7JB

Robert Sherwood, NC0B

William Tynan, W3XO (now SK)

Yasme Foundation

Anonymous

Anonymous

Anonymous

 

Each of these donors is an ARISS honorary team member; we are gratified for their robust backing of ARISS. 

 

ARISS wouldn't exist at all without its major sponsors.  We cannot extol enough, the continuing and vital support of: 

 

NASA Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN)

The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS)

Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT)

The American Radio Relay League (ARRL)

 

We fervently applaud them all.  NASA, AMSAT, and ARRL have backed ARISS since 1996 during its infancy when the team first developed ideas for the program! 

 

ARISS also pays tribute to the many other donors who firmly stood with ARISS's goals in 2018.  Even more important, many of these donors faithfully contribute their dollars year after year.

 

Every donor's support is critical to launching the new ARISS hardware in 2019. The new radio system will improve ARISS educational activities, the packet and SSTV capabilities, and will include other exciting communications features, such as a voice repeater.  The new system will ensure that ARISS communications will continue seamlessly for the weekly school and youth group radio contacts with astronauts on the Space Station. 

 

ARISS has a ways to go to reach our dollar goal before launches of new equipment can occur, and there is not a lot of time left.  2018 ARISS donors stated that they hoped their generosity would encourage others to become ARISS backers. You can join in the funding challenge by contacting Frank Bauer, ka3hdo@gmail.com or Rosalie White, k1sto@arrl.org. We hope to hear from you! Contributions can be given directly at http://www.ariss.org/donate.html

 

ARISS saw a very positive 2018.  We hope for an even more stupendous 2019 thanks to generous donors like you.  Thank you for your support!

 

AMSAT logo.jpg

ARRL Logo.pngMedia Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@amsat.org

 

 



domingo, 27 de janeiro de 2019

REP-ARISS inscrições escolares para contato com a ISS





Exmos Senhores 

Organizações escolares e juvenis, interessadas em estabelecer um contato rádio com um astronauta a bordo da Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS), são convidadas a apresentar uma inscrição acompanhada de um projeto educacional a desenvolver nesse âmbito.

período de envio de candidaturas iniciar-se-à a 1 de fevereiro decorrendo até 29 de março de 2019 . A seleção da escola ocorrerá em maio de 2019.

O contato espacial deverá ser provisoriamente programado para o período que irá de janeiro a junho de 2020 .

A candidatura deverá ser enviada por email para  o endereço: cs5ss@rep.pt 
Não espere até os últimos dias para enviar seus pedidos 
O acompanhamento e orientação através do processo de seleção será feito através de um Mentor da ARISS e da REP sendo que se o projeto for selecionado, será esse Mentor que colaborará em toda a preparação necessária para o contato.
Sublinhamos esta disponibilidade da ARIS e da REP para que numa colaboração estreita com todas as partes envolvidas durante este processo se obtenha o maior sucesso neste evento!
Geral
As agências espaciais envolvidas confiam à ARISS a tarefa do desenvolvimento de contatos através de Radioamadores e das Escolas, permitindo assim que os alunos coloquem perguntas aos astronautas a bordo da Estação Espacial Internacional e recebam suas respostas em direto do espaço.

Assim as escolas candidatas deverão preparar um espaço educativo orientado e submetê-lo, juntamente com um documento de "Candidatura", ao Gerente de Seleção da ARISS School, Francesco De Paolis, IKØWGF. 

Todos os documentos devem ser enviados por e-mail para cs5ss@rep.pt 
IMPORTANTE: Por favor, leia atentamente os documentos disponibilizados. Toda a documentação será enviada para o grupo REP-ARISS que os encaminhará para o grupo/responsável de seleção de escolas da ARISS. 
Nota: No caso de conhecerem professores/radioamadores façam o favor de divulgar esta informação.
Procedimento para Contatos na Escola ARISS 
Os melhores cumprimentos.
A equipa REP-ARISS Portugal


REP-ARISS atividade SSTV Inter-MAI


Ativação Inter-MAI agendada para 30 de janeiro a 1 de fevereiro de 2019

Foram recebidas informações de que o Instituto de Aviação de Moscovo conduzirá seu período de experimento SSTV de 30 de janeiro a 1 de fevereiro de 2019. Parece que a experiência só vai estar ativo durante algumas órbitas que sobrevoam Moscovo em vez de uma operação contínua. 
Os períodos aproximados de ativação da SSTV parecem estar entre as 13:00 e as 19:00 UTC. 
A atividade deve ocorrer no downlink tradicional de 145.800 MHz.

quarta-feira, 23 de janeiro de 2019

Escola portuguesa vai estabelecer contacto rádio com a ISS - Estação Espacial Internacional


           

Escola portuguesa vai estabelecer contacto rádio com a Estação Espacial Internacional - ISS


Os alunos do Colégio Campo de Flores (Lazarim-Almada), com o apoio da Rede dos Emissores Portugueses - REP, vão estabelecer contacto rádio via CS5SS com astronautas da ISS.

 

Convidamos-vos a participar neste evento live com a Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS).

 

Este evento visa contactar, oficialmente, o astronauta David St-Jacques KG5FYI (elemento tripulação da ISS atual) via rádio com o indicativo OR4ISS.

 

Este evento acontecerá dia 2 de fevereiro de 2019 cerca das 15h23 UTC.

 

O evento consiste em 20 alunos, um de cada vez, faça a sua respetiva pergunta inglês (pré-aprovada) em sobre o tema "Espaço" ao astronauta David St-Jacques para responda em tempo real. Estas questões serão colocadas e respondidas dentro de um período de +- 20 minutos.

O meio de comunicação entre o Colégio Campo de Flores e a Estação Espacial Internacional serão providenciados e garantidos pelo grupo de trabalho REP-ARISS.

O objetivo principal deste tipo de evento é motivar o interesse dos mais jovens no aeroespacial bem como no rádio amadorismo

 

 

Sobre o Colégio Campo de Flores

Foi em 1967 que o nosso Colégio abriu as portas aos seus jovens alunos. Foi um ato simples, embora cheio de significado, que foi precedido por muito tempo de maturação da ideia pelos seus fundadores, então com pouco mais de trinta anos.

A criação de um Colégio em edifício construído de raiz não é, nem foi, tarefa fácil. Para além das densas teias burocráticas que a envolvem, há a parte financeira que solicita somas consideráveis e que foram em grande parte suportadas pelo Pai do fundador.

O edifício nasceu e cresceu na Quinta de S. Francisco dos Matos, no Lazarim, Caparica.

A fundadora, Maria Helena Almeida, apaixonada pelo "Método de Leitura João de Deus" e por toda a sua obra, gostou muito do nome Campo de Flores não só como homenagem pela obra do poeta – pedagogo, como também pela localização do Colégio ser no campo e as flores serem as crianças.

O Colégio no seu início não tinha a dimensão que hoje apresenta. Começou a funcionar com 150 alunos, hoje a população escolar supera os 1250 alunos. No começo apenas eram lecionadas as classes Pré-Primárias e Primárias, como então se designavam. Logo durante o 1º ano verificou-se a necessidade de proceder à sua ampliação, necessidade esta que se foi repetindo e realizando pelos tempos seguintes, até atingir a dimensão que hoje tem.

Foi uma vida cheia de acontecimentos felizes, alegres e também preocupantes.

Os encerramentos dos anos letivos eram um grande acontecimento pelas suas festas; tradição que ainda hoje se mantém por altura do Natal.

Outro acontecimento muito feliz foi o aparecimento do nosso Hino escrito pela Professora Maria do Carmo Arvelar Silva e musicado pela Professora D. Graciette Vasconcelos, grandes amigas e grandes mulheres nesta casa, como muitas outras.

Por aqui têm passado filhos dos nossos primeiros alunos que, por sua vez, quase já são pais.

Uma vida cheia para os seus fundadores, Maria Helena e Ricardo de Almeida (já falecido), que já estando reformada, ainda aparece para " matar saudades" e acompanhar a Sua Escola.

Os atuais gestores e diretores do Colégio são dois dos seus filhos que sabem estar a concretização deste sonho dependente da permanente dedicação e competência em o bem servir por todos os seus Colaboradores. O nosso lema: "MAIS SABER, MAIS VALER" deve ser entendido como o compromisso que todos assumimos com a exigência, o rigor, o otimismo e o conhecimento para melhor servirmos a sociedade. Mais informação em: www.campodeflores.com

 

Sobre a REP – Rede dos Emissores Portugueses

A REP é a Associação de Radioamadores mais antiga de Portugal, com 92 anos de existência.

Foi fundada em 1926, constituindo-se por Alvará do Governo Civil de Lisboa em 5 de março de 1930, e pelo Decreto-Lei n.º 36 438, de 29 de julho de 1947. É uma instituição de Utilidade Pública desde 10 de julho de 1980. É a representante em Portugal de Organismos internacionais, nomeadamente da IARU - International Amateur Radio Union, da qual é membro fundador, e membro da ARISS Europa.

É uma instituição de direito privado sem fins lucrativos, exclusivamente composta por Amadores, Investigadores e Exploradores das Tecnologias da Rádio e das Comunicações, através da emissão e receção de sinais em ondas médias e curtas, altas frequências e micro-ondas, comunicações aeroespaciais e digitais.

Tem por finalidade congregar e representar institucionalmente os radioamadores, de molde que resultem em benefício Educativo e Social, nomeadamente no âmbito das Ciências Radioelétricas de manifesto interesse público e civilizacional. Ver mais em: www.rep.pt

 

Sobre a ARISS - Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

O Radioamador na Estação Espacial Internacional (ARISS) inspira estudantes, em todo o mundo, para desenvolver os interesses e carreiras em ciência, tecnologia, engenharia e matemática através de oportunidades de comunicação de rádio amador com a tripulação em órbita na Estação Espacial Internacional (ISS). Os alunos aprendem sobre a vida a bordo da ISS e a explorar a Terra vista do espaço por meio de atividades de ciência e matemática.

 A ARISS oferece a oportunidade da comunidade escolar (alunos, professores, famílias e membros da comunidade) se tornarem mais conscientes dos benefícios substanciais de voos espaciais tripulados, e das explorações e descobertas que ocorrem no voo espacial.

Os alunos têm a oportunidade de aprender sobre tecnologias espaciais e as tecnologias envolvidas com comunicações espaciais através da exploração de rádio amador. 

Diversas organizações de radioamadores, e as agências espaciais dos EUA, Rússia, Canadá, Japão e Europa patrocinam esta oportunidade educacional fornecendo o equipamento e apoio operacional para permitir a comunicação direta entre a tripulação na ISS e estudantes de todo o mundo através de rádio amador.

Centenas de radioamadores de todo o mundo trabalham nos bastidores para tornar estas experiências educacionais possíveis. O Radioamadorismo é um passatempo popular e um serviço em que os participantes licenciados operaram equipamentos de comunicação com um profundo conhecimento da arte do rádio.

A ARISS foi criada e é gerida por um grupo de trabalho internacional, incluindo vários países da Europa, assim como Japão, Rússia, Canadá e EUA. A organização é mantida por voluntários das organizações de radioamadores nacionais e as AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) organizações internacionais de cada país. Dado que a ARISS é de âmbito internacional, a equipe coordena localmente com sua respetiva agência espacial e como uma equipe internacional através de grupos de trabalho, reuniões, teleconferências e webinars. Para mais informações visite www.ariss.org

 

Sobre o Astronauta – David Saint-Jacques


 

Engenheiro, canadiano, astro-físico e médico. Saint-Jacques foi selecionado em 2009, pela Agência Espacial Canadiana (Canadian Space Agency - CSA), para uma dos dois lugares de astronauta, depois de um longo processo de selecção que envolveu 5.351 candidatos.

 

A 3 de Dezembro de 2018, Saint-Jacques foi lançado para a ISS, a bordo de uma nave Soyuz MS-11, juntamente com o Comandante Oleg Kononenko, e a engenheira de vôo Anne McClain.

 

 

 

Outros contactos com a estação espacial internacional (ISS)

 

Escola Secundária da Estarreja

Escola EB I-JI Montenegro

Agrupamento Escolas do Fundão

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjKdNDI5TGs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56wl1DscpfU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vgip544Tp5M

 

Na medida do possível, agradecemos confirmação da vossa presença para efeitos de logística.

 

Toda a informação será publicada em http://www.rep.pt/cs5ss

 

Esperando receber as vossas respostas, agradecemos o tempo despendido.                    

 

Contactos:

 

Colégio Campo de Flores:

João Rafael CT1BOP (principal)

José Fernandes CT1FGK (coordinating teacher)

Sandra Gago (public relation contact)

www.campodeflores.com

REP - ARISS:

Luis California, CT2GOY (coordinating amateur REP-ARISS)

Tel.: +351 - 962 827 440

 

 

### 

Patrocinador:

                     

 

--
73, Carlos Nora, CT1END
NNNN 

https://docs.google.com/uc?id=0B5CueRyONNC2dDBFd3dxRmozNzA&export=downloadREDE DOS EMISSORES PORTUGUESES ®
Associação Nacional de Radioamadores - Fundada em 1926
         Avenida Yasser Arafat Nº 4 A, 2700-375 Amadora, Portugal
Email: rep@rep.pt                 Telef./Fax: (+351) 213 461 186
Página na Internet em http://www.rep.pt

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Mailtrack Remetente notificado por
Mailtrack 23/01/19 23:17:23

quinta-feira, 13 de dezembro de 2018

ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, United Kingdom.


ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for Serena Aunon-Chancellor KG5TMT with Kenilworth School and Sixth Form, Kenilworth, United Kingdom.
The event is scheduled Friday 14 December 2018 at approximately 12:55 UTC (13:55 CEWT).
The conversation will be conducted in English.
The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KSN.
The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

School Information:
Kenilworth School and Sixth Form is located in the historic town of Kenilworth in Warwickshire England, we are effectively in the dead centre of England.
The school is made up of 1880 students and just over 200 teaching and support staff.

We are a true comprehensive school meaning that we do not select students on their academic abilities when starting school and teach students with a range of academic abilities. This being said, we are the top performing non selective school in the whole of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull based on last year's GCSE results and have been judged as an Outstanding school by Ofsted and have recently been awarded World Class School status.

The school has a successful and very popular Space, Rocket and Robotics extra-curricular club run by Mr Harwood - Suther. Students have taken part in many activities such as building their own Galilean telescopes, rocket cars and taking part in a number of robotic competitions organised by VEX, as well as taking part in regular stargazing events. We have also been extremely lucky to have hosted samples of moon rock for our students to look at on two occasions.

The school has also been awarded the Space Education Quality Mark (Silver) as well as the Teen Tech Award Centre for Innovation (Silver).

Students First Names & Questions:
1. Max B. (Age 11): What surprised you the most when you entered space?
2. Jacob G. (Age 12): Do you believe there is some form of living extra-terrestrial intelligent lifeforms beyond earth, not just bacteria and fossils?
3. Eva R. (Age 11): During your training would you be able to describe your hardest moment and your most enjoyable experience from your training?
4. George J. (Age 11): How do you find the food in space compared to when you are back on earth?
5. Anya B. (Age 11): When you were a child did you always know you wanted to be an astronaut and fly to space?
6. John T. (Age 13): Where would you prefer to live, on board The ISS or Earth?
7. Elin B. (Age 11): What kind of plant life can be grown on the ISS as there is no oxygen or CO2 in space?
8. Alfie S. (Age 11): Why do liquids when poured out in space, always form round blobs?
9. Freddie B-S. (Age 12): From information that I have read, male astronauts say that "space" smells very metallic.  Is it any different for female astronauts in space?
10. Dorottya V. (Age 12): How will it be possible to live on Mars and plant trees, flowers, and create an earth like environment?
11. Sam S. (Age 13): If you are in space, how does the zero gravity make you taller?
12. Clarissa/Elly (Age 12): Is the sunrise brighter than on earth?
13. Simon B. (Age 12): I am interested about Europa which orbits Jupiter. If life was found on Europa, what are the biological protocols to protect indigenous life and samples on or from other worlds?
14. Esme H. (Age 11): How long did it take to get used to life on the space station?
15. Matthew K. (Age 11): What is the daily day to day routine in regards to personal hygiene?
16. Megan M. (Age 12): This is your first visit to the to the International Space Station.  What are your thoughts on another opportunity and perhaps take part in a spacewalk?
17. Nuala R. (Age 13): Does it feel like you're moving when you're on the ISS or do you just feel as though you are floating in the emptiness of space?
18. Lior I. (Age 14): What do you think will change in space stations in the future decade?
19. Melody H. (Age 11): What's your favourite thing to do in space?
20. Flora V. (Age 11): When you come back to earth do you see the earth differently than you did before you left?
21. Tom E. (Age 11): What is the strangest thing you have seen in space?

About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support. 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/.

73,

Gaston Bertels - ON4WF

ISS Tracking